Job Interview Body Language: 5 Proven Tips For Success​

Job Interview Body Language: 5 Proven Tips For Success​

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Body Language Interview Tips everyone must know in order to perform best during any formal interview. Body language can have a big impact on the way you’re perceived by others, especially at work. It can seem silly but there are psychological reasons behind it, so thinking about how you’re carrying and expressing yourself at the office shouldn’t be forgotten.

Appearance counts during interviews- not only how you dress, but also how you carry yourself. Even if your responses to questions are flawless, the wrong body language can send the wrong signal and sour how you’re perceived.

In the start of the Interview: The Handshake

Most likely, the handshake will be your only moment of physical contact with the interviewer. Studies say that handshakes play a significant role in first impressions, so make it count. Aim for a firm handshake, and as you shake, make eye contact and smile.

Eye Contact

Too little eye contact can portray a lack of confidence or give the other person a sense that you may be hiding something. Too much eye contact and you may come off as overly aggressive which can actually leave just as bad of an impression. Knowing just the right amount of eye contact to maintain during a conversation can definitely be a bit of an enigmatic subject for some.

Gestures

If you’re not sure what to do with your hands, go ahead and gesture while speaking.

When your palms are up, it signals honesty and engagement. The limbic brain picks up the positivity, which will make the interviewer comfortable. In general, upward-facing body language such as open palms, smiles and straight posture also makes you look energetic

The walk

Interviewers often make a hiring judgment within the first 10 seconds of meeting you. How you walk into the room is a part of that judgment. Shoulders pulled back and neck elongated, each stride should be roughly one to two feet wide. Walk directly toward the person you are meeting with every body part pointing in his direction, maintaining eye contact with occasional breaks to the side.

Nod while listening

Aside from keeping eye and face contact, nodding your head while listening is an additional way to show attentiveness. Nod your head occasionally to let them know you are enjoying and understand what is being said.

Use body posture to your advantage. Though mirroring people’s body posture is most often done on a subconscious level when they find each other agreeable, you can still use the phenomenon to your advantage in a conscious manner. Just be careful not to overdo it.

 

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